Concrete Echoes of Brean Down Bombing Range

Brean Down concrete directional arrow from World War Two, Somerset coast.(Image: Chris Talbot / Brean Down – Bombing Range Directional Arrow / CC BY-SA 2.0)

Not only is beautiful Brean Down in Somerset, England, known for its captivating Bronze Age history, the promontory also played an important part in the Second World War. Just a stones throw from the popular Victorian seaside resort of Weston-super-Mare, a massive concrete arrows lies set into the earth, a reminder of the days when British and Allied aircraft dropped training bombs into the chilly waters of Bridgwater Bay. The giant Brean Down directional arrow is clearly illustrated in the above image.

From our previous article covering Brean Down and other ranges: “Located between Brean Down and the tiny hamlet of Lilstock, a Second World War gunnery range was established in connection with RNAS Yeovilton. The Lilstock Royal Navy Range is still in use for Fleet Air Arm helicopter crews to practice their gunnery skills. It was also used by fixed-wing aircraft dropping inert bombs until 1995.”

“…The shallows may be out of bounds (for good reason) and navigational aids far more sophisticated than their World War Two predecessors, but the abandoned concrete directional arrow built to guide bomber crews onto their dummy targets remains extant – assuming you know where to look. Read more here.

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Former St Kentigern’s Church, Hidden Behind Edinburgh Tenements

The former St Kentigern's Church in Edinburgh, Scotland.(Image: Kim Traynor. The former St Kentigern’s Church by Edinburgh’s Union Canal)

Take a stroll over the Viewforth Bridge – which crosses Edinburgh‘s Union Canal and connects the Fountainbridge area to Gilmore Place – and you may notice a curious abandoned church standing on a seemingly-inaccessible plot of land behind a row of Victorian tenements. The structure, long disused for its original purpose, has been steadily hemmed in by modern canal-side redevelopment. The land around it, which is accessed via a gated pend under St Peter’s Place, is now used for private car parking.

The forgotten Episcopalian church has been threatened with demolition. (Image: Thomas Nugent)

The intriguing ecclesiastical structure was once St Kentigern’s Church, a mission station of St John’s Episcopal Church in the city’s West End. St Kentigern’s was designed by Scottish architect John More Dick Peddie (of Caledonian Waldorf Astoria fame) and opened in 1897. It ceased operating as a church in 1941. Subsequently used as a garage and nursery, it later became a warehouse.Built in 1897, St Kentigern's Church by the Union Canal closed in 1941 and was later used as a nursery and warehouse.(Image: Mr H)

There were plans some years ago to demolish the abandoned church and replace it with a mixed use development incorporating modern flats and a bar amid ongoing redevelopment along the Union Canal. But concerns were raised by local residents and preservationists who didn’t want the historic structure flattened.

(Image: Stephen Craven)

David McDonald of the Cockburn Association told the Scotsman: “Apart from the building’s appealing scale and aesthetics, it is also one of very few buildings of historic interest on this section of the Union Canal. Saving this building will help safeguard a diversity of building styles on the canal frontage. Potential uses we envisage could include a cafe, restaurant, nursery, office or even a residential unit.”

In 2015, the Edinburgh Evening News reported that a police swoop on the former St Kentigern’s Church had revealed an extensive cannabis farm with a street value of £50,000 to £75,000. Fast forward several years and the handsome Episcopalian building still endures, its environs shrouded by greenery amid the encroaching developments of today.

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Former St Kentigern’s Church, Hidden Behind Edinburgh Tenements

The former St Kentigern's Church in Edinburgh, Scotland.(Image: Kim Traynor. The former St Kentigern’s Church by Edinburgh’s Union Canal)

Take a stroll over the Viewforth Bridge – which crosses Edinburgh‘s Union Canal and connects the Fountainbridge area to Gilmore Place – and you may notice a curious abandoned church standing on a seemingly-inaccessible plot of land behind a row of Victorian tenements. The structure, long disused for its original purpose, has been steadily hemmed in by modern canal-side redevelopment. The land around it, which is accessed via a gated pend under St Peter’s Place, is now used for private car parking.

The forgotten Episcopalian church has been threatened with demolition. (Image: Thomas Nugent)

The intriguing ecclesiastical structure was once St Kentigern’s Church, a mission station of St John’s Episcopal Church in the city’s West End. St Kentigern’s was designed by Scottish architect John More Dick Peddie (of Caledonian Waldorf Astoria fame) and opened in 1897. It ceased operating as a church in 1941. Subsequently used as a garage and nursery, it later became a warehouse.Built in 1897, St Kentigern's Church by the Union Canal closed in 1941 and was later used as a nursery and warehouse.(Image: Mr H)

There were plans some years ago to demolish the abandoned church and replace it with a mixed use development incorporating modern flats and a bar amid ongoing redevelopment along the Union Canal. But concerns were raised by local residents and preservationists who didn’t want the historic structure flattened.

(Image: Stephen Craven)

David McDonald of the Cockburn Association told the Scotsman: “Apart from the building’s appealing scale and aesthetics, it is also one of very few buildings of historic interest on this section of the Union Canal. Saving this building will help safeguard a diversity of building styles on the canal frontage. Potential uses we envisage could include a cafe, restaurant, nursery, office or even a residential unit.”

In 2015, the Edinburgh Evening News reported that a police swoop on the former St Kentigern’s Church had revealed an extensive cannabis farm with a street value of £50,000 to £75,000. Fast forward several years and the handsome Episcopalian building still endures, its environs shrouded by greenery amid the encroaching developments of today.

The post Former St Kentigern’s Church, Hidden Behind Edinburgh Tenements appeared first on Urban Ghosts Media.

“Man in the Hole”: Lone Survivor of Remote Amazonian Tribe Caught on Film (VIDEO)

A remarkable story published in The Independent tells of an indigenous man who is believed to be the last survivor of an uncontacted Amazonian tribe that was reportedly decimated by commercial interests more than two decades ago.

Spotted chopping down a tree in the Brazilian rainforest, the lone tribesman, who has lived a solitary existence for at least 22 years, is reported to be “in good health and capable of hunting and farming food.”

Nicknamed “the man in the hole” due to the deep pits he dug, perhaps in order to take shelter or ambush prey, he was last noted in 1996 by government workers following an attack on his community by illegal logging and farming interests. But he made clear he wanted nothing to do with the outsiders, who put in place an exclusion zone to protect him in the future.

A spokesperson for Funai, the country’s National Indian Foundation, said: “In the 1980s, disorderly colonisation, the establishment of farms and illegal logging led to repeated attacks on the isolated indigenous peoples who had lived there until then, in a constant process of expulsion from their lands and death.”

They added: “This man, unknown to us, even losing everything, like his people and a series of cultural practices, has proved that, even then, alone in the middle of the bush, it is possible to survive and resist allying with society.”

The man in the hole now lives in the Tanaru indigenous reserve. Discrete monitoring is in place to ensure his continued wellbeing and protection from unwanted outsiders.

Featured image by Shao (cc-sa-3.0)

Read Also: Abandoned School Bus Near San Pedro de Atacama

The post “Man in the Hole”: Lone Survivor of Remote Amazonian Tribe Caught on Film (VIDEO) appeared first on Urban Ghosts Media.

“Man in the Hole”: Lone Survivor of Remote Amazonian Tribe Caught on Film (VIDEO)

A remarkable story published in The Independent tells of an indigenous man who is believed to be the last survivor of an uncontacted Amazonian tribe that was reportedly decimated by commercial interests more than two decades ago.

Spotted chopping down a tree in the Brazilian rainforest, the lone tribesman, who has lived a solitary existence for at least 22 years, is reported to be “in good health and capable of hunting and farming food.”

Nicknamed “the man in the hole” due to the deep pits he dug, perhaps in order to take shelter or ambush prey, he was last noted in 1996 by government workers following an attack on his community by illegal logging and farming interests. But he made clear he wanted nothing to do with the outsiders, who put in place an exclusion zone to protect him in the future.

A spokesperson for Funai, the country’s National Indian Foundation, said: “In the 1980s, disorderly colonisation, the establishment of farms and illegal logging led to repeated attacks on the isolated indigenous peoples who had lived there until then, in a constant process of expulsion from their lands and death.”

They added: “This man, unknown to us, even losing everything, like his people and a series of cultural practices, has proved that, even then, alone in the middle of the bush, it is possible to survive and resist allying with society.”

The man in the hole now lives in the Tanaru indigenous reserve. Discrete monitoring is in place to ensure his continued wellbeing and protection from unwanted outsiders.

Featured image by Shao (cc-sa-3.0)

Read Also: Abandoned School Bus Near San Pedro de Atacama

The post “Man in the Hole”: Lone Survivor of Remote Amazonian Tribe Caught on Film (VIDEO) appeared first on Urban Ghosts Media.

Nine Stones Rig, East Lothian

Nine Stones Rig stone circle in East Lothian, Scotland.(Image: Urban Ghosts. Nine Stones Rig stone circle in East Lothian)

Perched high on the barren moorland of the Southern Uplands, in East Lothian, Scotland, is a small circle of irregular standing stones known locally as Nine Stones Rig. This enigmatic stone circle above Whiteadder Reservoir, which offers panoramic views of the surrounding hillsides, is thought to be of Bronze Age origin and appears to have been tampered with as the decades have slowly passed.

Unlike ancient Britain’s larger stone monuments – from Avebury and Stonehenge in the south to the Ring of Brodgar and the Standing Stones of Stenness in the north – the mysterious Nine Stones Rig, along with a network of other small circles including Penshiel Hill, Mayshiel, the Crow Stones and nearby Kingside Hill, are little visited, and less well known as a result.

Kingside Hill stone circle in the Southern Uplands.(Image: Urban Ghosts. Ring of tiny stones on Kingside Hill)

But these ancient stone monuments are equally compelling in their own right, lonely echoes of the farming folk who inhabited these wild uplands thousands of years ago. And as with many esoteric sites whose origins remains shrouded in mystery, folklore has moved in to fill the gaps in the millennia-old history of Nine Stones Rig (sometimes referred to as Nine Stanes Rig).

Nine Stanes Rig.(Image: Urban Ghosts. Close up of “Nine Stanes Rig”)

The Megalithic Portal quotes an older source on its website, stating:

An intriguing entry taken from a Name Book of 1853 says: “A circle of nine stones. It is believed that some treasure is hidden beneath these stones and various attempts, all unsuccessful, have been made to find it.”

As we’ve discussed before, the tantalising concept of hidden treasure is popular in folklore, and may refer to the notion of lost or secret knowledge, rather than physical riches. Clearly that hasn’t stopped people digging, however.

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Search for Malaysia Airlines MH370 to End – After One Last Area is Investigated

Unsolved aviation mysteries: 9M-MRO, the Boeing 777 that disappeared in 2014 while operating as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.(Image: Laurent ERRERA; 9M-MRO, the Boeing 777 that disappeared in 2014 while operating as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370)

It’s one of the most bizarre aircraft disappearances in history, a modern aviation mystery that’s confounded crash investigators for almost half a decade. But earlier this week it was reported that the four year hunt for the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – a Boeing 777 which disappeared from radar on March 8, 2014 – is coming to an end – as soon as “one last spot of interest” has been searched.

MH370 was a scheduled flight en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing when it vanished with 239 souls on board. Despite a massive international search effort across vast areas of Indian Ocean seafloor, scientists have been unable to locate the missing airliner. Several large pieces of debris confirmed as having come from the 777 have washed up on shores east of Madagascar. But more than four years after the plane’s disappearance, its main body has never been found.

MH370's known flight path before disappearing from radar in 2014.(Image: AHeneen; MH370’s known flight path before disappearing from radar in 2014)

Theories range from the plausible to the wildly imaginative, and it’s little surprise that the mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has caught the attention of conspiracy theorists across the globe. In the meantime, though, families of the 239 missing passengers and crew have not given up hope that the remains of the aircraft will be found.

Yesterday The Guardian reported that Ocean Infinity, the private company most recently searching for the missing 777, had sent its Seabed Constructor mapping ship to an area of seabed flagged up by a Chinese patrol vessel in 2014.

Ocean Shield, an Australian vessel launches a submersible in 2014 in the search for the missing Malaysian 777.(Image: US Navy; an Australian vessel launches a submersible in 2014 in the search for the missing Malaysian 777)

According to the newspaper: “The Guardian has learned that the seafront exploration company’s Seabed Constructor vessel will sail to the spot in the southern Indian Ocean where a Chinese patrol ship detected an ultrasonic pulse – which could have been consistent with that from a black box – in 2014.”

The Guardian added: “A spokesperson for Ocean Infinity confirmed the company was aware of the reports of the possible black box signal four years ago, and it was heading to the area to check it out for themselves “before we head to port and bring this search to a close”.”

The post Search for Malaysia Airlines MH370 to End – After One Last Area is Investigated appeared first on Urban Ghosts Media.

Search for Malaysia Airlines MH370 to End – After One Last Area is Investigated

Unsolved aviation mysteries: 9M-MRO, the Boeing 777 that disappeared in 2014 while operating as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.(Image: Laurent ERRERA; 9M-MRO, the Boeing 777 that disappeared in 2014 while operating as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370)

It’s one of the most bizarre aircraft disappearances in history, a modern aviation mystery that’s confounded crash investigators for almost half a decade. But earlier this week it was reported that the four year hunt for the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – a Boeing 777 which disappeared from radar on March 8, 2014 – is coming to an end – as soon as “one last spot of interest” has been searched.

MH370 was a scheduled flight en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing when it vanished with 239 souls on board. Despite a massive international search effort across vast areas of Indian Ocean seafloor, scientists have been unable to locate the missing airliner. Several large pieces of debris confirmed as having come from the 777 have washed up on shores east of Madagascar. But more than four years after the plane’s disappearance, its main body has never been found.

MH370's known flight path before disappearing from radar in 2014.(Image: AHeneen; MH370’s known flight path before disappearing from radar in 2014)

Theories range from the plausible to the wildly imaginative, and it’s little surprise that the mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has caught the attention of conspiracy theorists across the globe. In the meantime, though, families of the 239 missing passengers and crew have not given up hope that the remains of the aircraft will be found.

Yesterday The Guardian reported that Ocean Infinity, the private company most recently searching for the missing 777, had sent its Seabed Constructor mapping ship to an area of seabed flagged up by a Chinese patrol vessel in 2014.

Ocean Shield, an Australian vessel launches a submersible in 2014 in the search for the missing Malaysian 777.(Image: US Navy; an Australian vessel launches a submersible in 2014 in the search for the missing Malaysian 777)

According to the newspaper: “The Guardian has learned that the seafront exploration company’s Seabed Constructor vessel will sail to the spot in the southern Indian Ocean where a Chinese patrol ship detected an ultrasonic pulse – which could have been consistent with that from a black box – in 2014.”

The Guardian added: “A spokesperson for Ocean Infinity confirmed the company was aware of the reports of the possible black box signal four years ago, and it was heading to the area to check it out for themselves “before we head to port and bring this search to a close”.”

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Dismantled Gloster Meteor Sections at East Midlands Aeropark

Dismantled Gloster Meteor NF(T)14 WS760.(Image: @planedailymag. Dismantled Gloster Meteor centre section)

Anonymous old military jets are always intriguing, including these dismantled Meteor parts on the edge of East Midlands Aeropark in Leicestershire, UK. The airframe components include centre and rear fuselage sections, and a pair of wings. There was no cockpit section in evidence when this photograph was taken. But according to the aviation-themed Instagram account @planedailymag, another Gloster Meteor cockpit (from airframe WM367) was present under a protective tarpaulin within the museum site. @planedailymag speculated whether the cockpit section would be combined with the other parts (believed to be from Meteor NF(T)14 WS760) to make a complete airframe. Watch this space! It’s fair to say, however, that if a restoration is carried out to the same standards as East Midlands Aeropark’s other exhibits, the result will be impressive!

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The 16th Century Ruins of Thorpe Hall, South Yorkshire

The ruins of Thorpe Hall stand in the village of Thorpe Salvin, South Yorkshire.(Image: John Topping. The ruins of Thorpe Hall in South Yorkshire)

Rising ominously above the attractive South Yorkshire village of Thorpe Salvin, the 16th century ruins of Thorpe Hall stand on the site of an older manor house long since lost to history.

Thorpe Hall(Image: h v green)

According to the village’s Wikipedia page, the extant structure was built in 1570 by Robert Smythson, and later sold to an Edward Osborne more than 60 years later. Thorpe Hall remained the Osborne family home until Edward’s descendent Thomas, having become Duke of Leeds, relocated to Kiveton Park. Thereafter Thorpe Hall was abandoned and fell into disrepair.

(Image: Richard Croft)

A decade or so before the advent of the Victorian era, the ruin was partially demolished. Only its Grade II listed southern facade still stands today. The first mansion to occupy the site was the home of Sir Bryan Sandford, a Tudor knight who fought at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.

Related: Three Beautiful Abandoned Mansions of County Galway

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